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10 Tips for Protecting Your Workshop


14 Apr 2008

security

Invest in solid padlocks

Strong fencing is a good deterrant

Make alarm systems visible


 

1. Locks and Padlocks: Locks on all outside entrances and inside security doors should be double cylinder deadbolts with removable collars. The deadbolt should have at least one inch throw containing a hardened steel insert and protected by a latch guard. Padlocks should be of hardened steel, mounted on bolted hasps and always locked to prevent exchange. Serial numbers should be filed off to prevent new keys from being made.

2. Doors: All outside and security doors should be of solid construction, metal lined and secured with heavy metal crossbars. Jambs around doors must be solid. All exposed hinges should be pinned to prevent removal.

3. Windows: Windows should have secure locks. Burglar-resistant glass treatments are also recommended. An example would be the installation of polyester security film. However, this must be used together with the alarm's glass break sensor. Heavy metal grates may be used on windows of high vulnerability (such as rear windows). Check with your area Fire Code Inspector for safety requirements.

4. Lights: Lights must provide optimum visibility, both inside and out, with outside lights having vandal-proof covers over the lights and power sources. Your entire perimeter must be well-lit, especially around doors and other possible entry points.

5. Alarm System: The alarm system should be supplied and installed by a licensed alarm company with a central monitoring station. Check the alarm system on a daily basis. For an even better self-defense tactic, advertise its presence to deter break-ins with the company's sticker or yard sign.

6.  Cash Register: The cash register should be kept in plain view from outside the building so it can be easily monitored and should be left open when empty and not in use.

7.  Safe/Strongbox: It should be fireproof, burglar-resistant, anchored securely and in plain view. Leave it open when it is empty, and use it to lock up valuables when business is closed. Change the combination whenever someone with access is released from your employment.

8.  Building Exterior: The exterior should be checked including the roof, basement, and walls. Secure all openings. Maintain good visibility by not allowing landscaping, boxes,rubbish bins, vehicles, or equipment near your building where they might provide concealment or access to the roof.

9.  Perimeter Fences: The fences need to be adequate enough to keep intruders out, and at the same time allow good visibility of your business by neighbors and police. A good example of fencing would be vertical iron bar or 1/8 inch mesh chain link.

10. Key Controls & ID Numbers: Keys should be handed out in responsible manner. A master key system where one key opens all locks may be convenient, but it may not be the best for security. Code all keys, keep them securely locked when not in use, and do not allow employees to leave them lying around or make duplicates. Change locks whenever you suspect key security has been compromised. Marking equipment with ID numbers should be displayed to make this plainly evident to would-be thieves. Also, keeping a record of serial numbers on all equipment may help in recovery.

 

For more information on Workshop Security and much more check out the April Issue of Autobay magazine, out now. 

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